ABOUT US

This stylish function suite is the hidden gem of Edinburgh’s Old Town. Boasting traditional period features and a unique atmosphere the venue comprises a main banqueting hall and an intimate lounge with a self-contained bar, allowing for a total capacity of 249 guests.

The Counting House offers a range of packages to meet all requirements, and is an ideal location for all occasions from ceilidhs, wedding receptions and birthday parties to, club or society meetings and fund-raising events.

We can also provide assistance in planning your function to ensure your guests have an unforgettable experience.

Celebrate in only the finest surroundings.

Our history

Built in 1749 as the residence of merchant William Reed, The Peartree House is situated in close proximity to Arthur’s Seat overlooking the Meadows.  Today, the building and grounds remain true to their 18th century design.

Over its varied history the Peartree has provided the locus for many of the city’s influential citizens.  In 1756 it passed to Sir James Fergusson, Lord of Session, and remained in his family until 1770.

Until 1791 the two upper storeys were occupied by poet Thomas Blacklock whose family moved in the literary circles of the day, both Robert Burns and Dr Johnson having enjoyed the hospitality of the house.

The Peartree subsequently moved into the hands of the Usher family where in 1826 Andrew Usher, progenitor of the famous brewing and distilling dynasty, was born.  A family fortune was thereafter built on whisky, the company being amongst the first to popularise blended whisky.

Usher  rose in status ranking amongst Edinburgh’s most prominent citizens and was a well known benefactor and philanthropist when in 1892 he gifted the funds necessary to build a substantial civic hall for the city.  The dome of the Usher Hall was in fact modeled on that of the upper floor of the Peartree House, a period feature which still lends much atmosphere to the Counting House today.

After WW1 family distilling interests were taken over by Scottish Malt Distillers Ltd and the Peartree passed into the hands of new owners where until 1976 the building and courtyard were contingent the firm’s whisky trade.

For much of the 1970’s the building lay derelict until, in 1982, the Peartree House took on its present incarnation as a public house with the upper floor, the Counting House, providing one of the most unique and atmospheric function venues to be found in the old town.